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Opiod Alternatives

 

Opioid Addiction is a National Crisis. More People Die Each Year From Prescription Drugs than Illegal Drugs! Dont Get Caught Up In This Tsunami Of Death!

Our Team can prevent you from becoming addicted. Or we can help you beat your current addiction! (If you are currently taking opioids or narcotics, you are addicted whether or not you realize it!)
Here is what the CDC says:
“CDC Recommends Physical Therapy and Other Nondrug Options for Chronic Pain
With overuse of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain becoming a national public health epidemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released guidelines that recommend nondrug approaches such as physical therapy over long-term or high-dosage use of addictive prescription painkillers.
"Nonpharmacologic therapy and nonopioid pharmacologic therapy are preferred for chronic pain," the guidelines state ("CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain - United States, 2016" - March 15, 2016). "Clinicians should consider opioid therapy only if expected benefits for both pain and function are anticipated to outweigh risks to the patient. If opioids are used, they should be combined with nonpharmacologic therapy and nonopioid pharmacologic therapy, as appropriate."
While there are certain conditions - including cancer treatment, palliative care, and end-of-life care - where opioid prescription for chronic pain may be appropriate, the CDC cited numerous cases where opioid use could be significantly reduced or avoided altogether.”
According to the APTA Patients should choose physical therapy when ...
... “The risks of opioid use outweigh the rewards.
Potential side effects of opioids include depression, overdose, and addiction, plus withdrawal symptoms when stopping opioid use. Because of these risks, "experts agreed that opioids should not be considered firstline or routine therapy for chronic pain," the CDC guidelines state. Even in cases when evidence on the long-term benefits of non-opioid therapies is limited, "risks are much lower" with non-opioid treatment plans.
... Patients want to do more than mask the pain.
Opioids reduce the sensation of pain by interrupting pain signals to the brain. Physical therapists treat pain through movement while partnering with patients to improve or maintain their mobility and quality of life.
... Pain or function problems are related to low back pain, hip or knee osteoarthritis, or fibromyalgia.
The CDC cites "high-quality evidence" supporting exercise as part of a physical therapy treatment plan for those familiar conditions.
... Opioids are prescribed for pain.
Even in situations when opioids are prescribed, the CDC recommends that patients should receive "the lowest effective dosage," and opioids "should be combined" with nonopioid therapies, such as physical therapy.
... Pain lasts 90 days.
At this point, the pain is considered "chronic," and the risks for continued opioid use increase. An estimated 116 million Americans have chronic pain each year. The CDC guidelines note that nonopioid therapies are "preferred" for chronic pain and that "clinicians should consider opioid therapy only if expected benefits for both pain and function are anticipated to outweigh risks to the patient.”
We will help prevent addiction in the first place or provide a plan to help you beat your existing addiction! Combined with our onsite Medical Pain Management, Chiropractic Care, Massage and Acupuncture, our Team will help you navigate the treacherous complexities of opioid addiction and chronic pain.

Opioid Addiction is a National Crisis. More People Die Each Year From Prescription Drugs than Illegal Drugs! Dont Get Caught Up In This Tsunami Of Death!

 

Our Team can prevent you from becoming addicted. Or we can help you beat your current addiction! (If you are currently taking opioids or narcotics, you are addicted whether or not you realize it!)

 

Here is what the CDC says:

 

“CDC Recommends Physical Therapy and Other Nondrug Options for Chronic Pain

 

With overuse of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain becoming a national public health epidemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released guidelines that recommend nondrug approaches such as physical therapy over long-term or high-dosage use of addictive prescription painkillers.

 

"Nonpharmacologic therapy and nonopioid pharmacologic therapy are preferred for chronic pain," the guidelines state ("CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain - United States, 2016" - March 15, 2016). "Clinicians should consider opioid therapy only if expected benefits for both pain and function are anticipated to outweigh risks to the patient. If opioids are used, they should be combined with nonpharmacologic therapy and nonopioid pharmacologic therapy, as appropriate."

 

While there are certain conditions - including cancer treatment, palliative care, and end-of-life care - where opioid prescription for chronic pain may be appropriate, the CDC cited numerous cases where opioid use could be significantly reduced or avoided altogether.”

 

According to the APTA Patients should choose physical therapy when ...

 

... “The risks of opioid use outweigh the rewards.

 

Potential side effects of opioids include depression, overdose, and addiction, plus withdrawal symptoms when stopping opioid use. Because of these risks, "experts agreed that opioids should not be considered firstline or routine therapy for chronic pain," the CDC guidelines state. Even in cases when evidence on the long-term benefits of non-opioid therapies is limited, "risks are much lower" with non-opioid treatment plans.

 

... Patients want to do more than mask the pain.

 

Opioids reduce the sensation of pain by interrupting pain signals to the brain. Physical therapists treat pain through movement while partnering with patients to improve or maintain their mobility and quality of life.

 

... Pain or function problems are related to low back pain, hip or knee osteoarthritis, or fibromyalgia.

 

The CDC cites "high-quality evidence" supporting exercise as part of a physical therapy treatment plan for those familiar conditions.

 

... Opioids are prescribed for pain.

 

Even in situations when opioids are prescribed, the CDC recommends that patients should receive "the lowest effective dosage," and opioids "should be combined" with nonopioid therapies, such as physical therapy.

 

... Pain lasts 90 days.

 

At this point, the pain is considered "chronic," and the risks for continued opioid use increase. An estimated 116 million Americans have chronic pain each year. The CDC guidelines note that nonopioid therapies are "preferred" for chronic pain and that "clinicians should consider opioid therapy only if expected benefits for both pain and function are anticipated to outweigh risks to the patient.”

 

We will help prevent addiction in the first place or provide a plan to help you beat your existing addiction! Combined with our onsite Medical Pain Management, Chiropractic Care, Massage and Acupuncture, our Team will help you navigate the treacherous complexities of opioid addiction and chronic pain.

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